30 thoughts on “Look into my eyes

  1. Note: The carbon tax is being debated in parliament today, with a final vote in the House of Representatives due at 9am tomorrow. The opposition are doing everything in their power to stop this from happening.

  2. My understanding is that frog species are declining worldwide, but especially in Australia, because frogs are so sensitive to tiny changes in their environment: carbon, fungi, pesticides. One summer about ten years ago when I was on Cape Cod, I kept finding deformed and blind little frogs at night in the yard, the blind ones going in circles and the deformed ones with extra legs. They can be sensitive to carbon changes but also pesticides and other poisons in the environment which I think was the case on Cape Cod where a military base closed and left a toxic mess. Biologists were confirming these findings there. Frogs are our canaries in the coal mine. As go the frogs, so will go life on earth…

    • Hi Squirrel, I can’t help noticing how many pigeons have deformed feet, or lack of claws. I noticed it donkey’s years ago on the Durban beachfront. Every second pigeon had a foot problem of some sort. Now, in Johannesburg I see it too. Inbreeding? Or something more sinister? I agree with you about life on earth… Are eco systems in more trouble than we think?

      • Scientists already know that the planet is in deep doggy doodoo Denise – pollution of all types is impacting at every level – and it is the progress at any costs philosophy of capitalist societies (neo liberalism) throughout the world that is the root cause.

  3. Hi Squirrel, I can’t help noticing how many pigeons have deformed feet, or lack of claws. I noticed it donkey’s years ago on the Durban beachfront. Every second pigeon had a foot problem of some sort. Now, in Johannesburg I see it too. Inbreeding? Or something more sinister? I agree with you about life on earth… Are eco systems in more trouble than we think?

    • Denise, I used to work with a bird rescue service, and the pigeons have deformed feet due to a poor diet and lack of fresh water. You will notice that in many urban areas where pigeons mostly congregate there are no bird baths or fountains or even natural bodies of water. Birds need to drink too. On hot days I get the local kids in the area to help me fill small buckets and containers which we place in the local parks. The birds love it and it’s not just the pigeons who participate. I thought I might get in trouble for doing it but now the local Parks and Gardens dept is getting in on the act. I’m currently trying to get some permanent bird baths put in the parks which are self cleaning. If I had the money I’d fund them myself…..

    • Thanks Kate πŸ™‚ It has cleared the Lower House and will pass the Senate later in the year, but this is just the beginning of the issue as the Opposition has promised to repeal the price on carbon (see comment above). But at last, after decades of words, some action has happened.

  4. He doesn’t look very well. His eyes aren’t wide open. Adeeyoyo, you do get a pit of horror in your stomach when you see things. It can’t be inbreeding. Inbreeding is caused by human intervention in breeding. It is poisons that cause deformations. It is very very sad. These creatures are so helpless. It’s good when there is a local environmental organization to report these sightings to. On Cape Cod, they were taking counts.

    • The frog in the photo is healthy Squirrel – that is just the way their eyes are (it’s an Eastern Dwarf tree frog) – we are lucky to live in one of the more pristeen areas of Australia. In some of the big cities you would be hard pressed to come across any frogs. We have so many here that it is hard to sleep with the noise they make after the rain. Frogs are very sensitive to pollution/poisons but the increase in temperatures from climate change will also decimate frogs because of habitat loss and fragmentation and their relatively narrow habitat specificity and the increased exposure to ultra-violet light radtiation, amongst other issues.

  5. I sure hope the CGP has the desired effect, Gabe – but I suspect the worst polluters will just cough up and much of the proceeds will just end up being sucked into a bureaucratic black hole – terribly cynical, I know – it is definitely worth a go, though because it may just work – hope springs eternal

    • I don’t think the money raised from the tax is really the key issue bluebee (and it goes mainly back to the electorate) – it is the impost on the polluters that provides the incentive to move away from carbon intensive industries; and smart businesses will be forced to rethink in order to remain profitable. I think that it will have an impact – not necessarily in relation to the total volume of carbon reduced in comparison to the rest of the world (that would be a challenge given our small size), but in the creation of a shift in paradigm and opinions. This model is one that will provide significant incentives for energy conservation (renewables eg wind, solar and geothermal will become more competitive and comprehensive as the playing field will even out). There will be flow-on effects that we can’t even predict at this point in time – but this incentive will, at last, provide fuel for creative solutions to this difficult problem.

  6. I love that frog. He looks very wise. He is the Dalai Lama of froggies. He is saying: ‘Feed Tony Abbott to the lions…’ Well, maybe he’s not the Dalai Lama of frogs with that stance but very sensible, nonetheless *snort*

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